Durable Solutions for Refugees

Enabling Change through Education for Refugee Girls in Tanzania

Fourteen-year-old Congolese student, Joceline, carries her French and Kirundi language books to class at Hope Secondary School in Nyarugusu refugee camp, Tanzania In the Nduta refugee camp in north-west Tanzania, 93% of secondary school-aged girls are out of school Over the last two years, close to 400,000 Burundian refugees have fled their country due to…

Congratulations to the class of 2018!

On this year’s World Refugee Day, join us in celebrating the achievements of our most recent Student Refugee Program (SRP) graduates. Over the past four years, 437 refugee youth were welcomed onto Canadian campuses through the SRP. Because of your support, many of these students are now graduating and taking the next steps on their…

One student’s determination leads to refugee sponsorship at a Quebec CEGEP

By Catherine Traer and Gisèle Nyembwe | This story was originally published by UNHCR Canada. Read the original here. [article in French only] LEVIS, Canada – Catherine Dufort, a humanities and languages student at Cégep de Lévis-Lauzon, did not let herself be intimidated by the daunting task of convincing the entire school’s administration to sponsor a refugee to come…

State of Play: Digital and blended innovations for increased access to post-secondary education for refugee youth

WUSC releases new report on increasing access to post-secondary education for refugees in countries of asylum. By: Stephanie McBride, Senior Program Officer, Program Development & Kenya Equity in Education Project (KEEP) Globally, only 1% of refugees have access to post-secondary education. This number is even more worrying when we consider that, in 2016, we reached…
Photo of Amelie Fabian

From refugee camp to McGill student: Canadian sponsorship program makes a dream come true

Thanks to the Student Refugee Program (SRP), Amelie Fabian will be able to create the life she wants for herself. By Fatima Muneer, UNHCR Canada | This story was originally published by UNHCR Canada. Read the original here. “There’s no need for girls to just get a degree and then get married. We’re in a position…

Building Educational Pathways for Refugees: Mapping a Canadian peer-to-peer support model

World University Service of Canada has been mobilizing the Canadian post-secondary community to offer educational pathways for refugees for several decades through the Student Refugee Program (SRP). The SRP provides a one-of-a-kind partnership opportunity for universities, colleges, and CEGEPs to directly respond to the increasing need for durable solutions and higher education opportunities for refugees.…

Welcome! Bienvenue!

Students from around the world arrive in Canada Every year in August and September, members from the WUSC community gather at airports across the country to welcome a new cohort of students from around the world to Canada. Through our various sponsorship and scholarship programs, these youth are given the opportunity to continue their studies…

What Works for Girls’ Education

Evidence and Lessons Learned from our Programming in Kenya A recent study by UNHCR on education for refugees reports that fewer than one in four refugee adolescents are currently enrolled in secondary school. Though hard to imagine, the situation is even worse in low-income countries, where the majority of refugees live and where fewer than…

Remedial Education Program: An Innovation to Improve Girls’ Academic Performance in Refugee Contexts

Refugee girls face overwhelming barriers to accessing quality education. Beyond realities that affect many young women, such as early and forced marriage, early pregnancy, an unfair burden of domestic chores, and family financial constraints, refugee girls face further, unique challenges. With limited mobility and very few options for employment, refugee girls have limited incentives to…

5 stories of belonging from former refugees in Canada

Imagine having to rebuild your life in a new country. You are not a native speaker of the official languages. The food tastes different and your favourite ingredients are hard to find. The customs are unfamiliar and you feel uncertain in social settings. What would it take for you to begin to feel at home…

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